A Bumper Weekend for Wildlife!

The weather’s starting to turn colder and distinctly Autumnal now. We’ve got a crop of fungi flourishing on the lawn and raking and sweeping fallen leaves into piles as homes for hibernating wildlife is becoming a regular job.

With a weekend at home ahead of me, I decided to spend some time doing some wildlife focused jobs in the garden, and to put cameras out for as much of the weekend as possible to capture our garden visitors. For once my timing was spot on and I picked a great weekend to do this!

Bird Table Trail Camera

I recently bought some new trail cameras, as the original two became faulty and had to be returned. I chose the Browning Strike Force HD model from Wildview Cameras (https://www.wildviewcameras.co.uk). All of my recent Fieldmouse footage has been filmed using these, and I’m so pleased with the image quality. I’ve been eager to have an opportunity to try them out properly during the day, so with the addition of a +3 close up filter to allow focus at a distance of 33cm I set one up on the bird table and left it there for a few hours each morning.

Instead of video I tried out the photo mode – I set the camera to take 5 photos each time it sensed movement. I’m so pleased with the results, I can see I’ll be doing this a lot over the colder months.

Yesterday was a lovely bright day and the resulting image quality is just superb. Today conditions were a little more testing, being dull and quite dark for most of the day, but I’m still really pleased with the results.

Squirrel Feeder Pole

We’ve been plagued by the murderous cat again, and after one particularly horrible incident where he killed a baby squirrel, we were keen to put up a feeder that would allow squirrels to access it without crossing open ground. So I’ve put this one up by the hedge, which will allow them to get to it from hedging and trees rather than from the ground.

My Naturewatch Raspberry Pi Cam

Featured earlier this year on BBC Springwatch, My Naturewatch is software which allows you to build a basic wildlife camera using a Raspberry Pi. I’ve been keen to have a go, so ordered a kit containing all the necessary components from Pimoroni (available here).

The only other bits I had to add were a USB power bank and a plastic food box to form the outer casing. The kit was pretty easy to make and tool about an hour and a half – most of which was waiting for the software to download as our internet seemed to be on a go slow yesterday. But soon the kit was ready to go –

I actually ended up buying two kits, one contains a daylight camera and this one which contains a night vision one.

I put it inside the hedgehog feeder last night, as I hoped to get some closer up shots of our Fieldmouse. I need to do some work on positioning to find the best vantage point as there’s not much room inside the hedgehog feeder, but the results did not disappoint. I can see me having some fun with this little camera.

More about the My Naturewatch project and instructions for building the cameras can be found here – https://mynaturewatch.net.

Hedgehog Visitor

Of course the night that I fill the hedgehog feeder up with a camera box is the evening that the hedgehog returned! I saw one cross the road at the front of the house earlier this week so knew there was one around, but I couldn’t believe it when I checked the garden camera this morning and saw that one had been happily scurrying around the lawn for a good 3 hours last night.

As always, I have my fingers firmly crossed that this one sticks around! We think one hibernated here last Winter so it would be lovely if this one did likewise.

All in all, an incredible wildlife-filled weekend!

Autumn Arrives

It feels like five minutes ago that we were baking in the never ending heat and dryness of the Summer, and wishing for rain. Then, as meteorological Autumn arrived on the 1st of September, Summer seemed to heed the calendar, ending abruptly and the Autumn weather arrived with a bang. We’ve so far had two named storms and a 48 hour stretch of rain. Following the rain, the lawn seems studded with orange. It’s going to be a good Autumn for fungi, if this year’s crop of Deceivers is anything to go by. I’m hoping that their cousin, the Amethyst Deceiver will put in an appearance under the hedge this year as it does from time to time.

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After a fairly quiet and uneventful few weeks in terms of garden wildlife, this too has started to return. I was chuffed to see my favourite fluff-tastic flying lollipops, the Long-Tailed Tits arrive in the garden for the first time since the unseasonal snowy spell back in March. There seems to be a group of four or five of them that have teamed up with a couple of Blue Tits. It’s only having seen a Long-Tailed Tit feeding next to a teeny Blue Tit that I’ve really begun to appreciate just how small they actually are.

I’ve been keen to get some close up shots of Long-Tailed Tits since they started visiting the garden, so I was pleased that they’ve started to investigate the feeder nearest to the house, which allowed me to take photos of them through the kitchen window. They seem VERY interested in the kibbled peanuts on offer here.

This is the earliest that the Long-Tailed Tits have arrived in the garden – they normally turn up once Winter has properly set in. Do they know something that we don’t, I wonder – are we in for as cold a Winter as we had warm a Summer? I’m now just waiting for the Bullfinches to come back to the garden and then all our normal Winter visitors will be present and correct.

I’ve continued putting hedgehog food out nightly, but sadly no takers. Of the prickly variety, anyway. A couple of weeks ago I noticed that the bowl had started seemingly emptying itself overnight, so I set up a trailcam and soon the culprit was revealed – our Field Mouse!

Up until now he’s completely ignored the hedgehog food, so I think the colder weather has urged him to feed up and lay down some fat reserves ready for Winter. I felt bad for him, so started placing a hazelnut or two in the entrance of the feeder every few nights. These seem to be going down a treat! He often picks these up and runs off with them, probably to cache as part of his Winter store cupboard, but sometimes he can’t seem to resist and eats them on the spot!

I hope this is somewhat closer to his natural diet than the hedgehog food. I’m still really hoping a hedgehog finds its way to us this year – I’d love to have them around regularly.

Our first Garden Owl!

I’ve thought for a while that there may be owls around in our local area – where we live was planned as a ‘Garden Village’ after the war, and so we’re lucky enough to have small parks and open spaces at the end of most of the streets. These contain a lot of tall trees ideal for roosting and watching the activities (and potential prey) in the gardens below. I’d heard a Tawny Owl call from somewhere behind the house a couple of times in the middle of the night, but I’d never actually seen one around.

So I was thrilled to see a shape drop out of the sky at dusk the other evening, and alight on our next door neighbours roof. I was just thinking that the Woodpigeon was out late, and then it turned it’s head enough for me to see it’s silhouette – an owl!

It perched for a few minutes, from the movements of it’s head I suspect eating an evening snack. When finished, it flexed it’s wings a few times before flying off into the night. I so hope it comes back! I’m guessing it was a Tawny Owl, as it’s the species that makes most sense from the perspective of the habitat in our area.

I’d love to get a better look at it – I’ve only seen a Tawny Owl close up during a photography session at a Birds of Prey centre near me, from which the photos on this post are taken. I’m wondering if I rigged a trail cam to point upwards, whether that would work. Even if not, I’m just thrilled to have confirmation that we have them in the area, and that they are coming so close to the garden.